equality

London Black teachers network

Black teachers in London have recently launched an NUT network to help members achieve change and make an impact. View a short video of the launch here, including speaker David Lammy MP.

Show Racism the Red Card

The NUT supports Show Racism the Red Card, the campaign that uses top footballers to educate against racism.

Show Racism the Red Card has filmed professional football players addressing issues surrounding racism. The films help teachers and other training professionals to deliver training in their schools and workplaces. Each of the films is accompanied by an education pack containing lesson plans and activities for all ages.

A TUC Charter for Racial Justice in Education

The NUT is proud to support A Charter for Racial Justice in Education produced by the Trade Union Congress. The Charter aims to encourage greater dialogue between schools, colleges and universities with local communities.

The NUT believes that the support of local communities means that schools, teachers and young people can create a safer, more peaceful environment to live and study.

Show Racism the Red Card

The NUT supports Show Racism the Red Card, the campaign that uses top footballers to educate against racism.

Show Racism the Red Card has filmed professional football players addressing issues surrounding racism. The films help teachers and other training professionals to deliver training in their schools and workplaces. Each of the films is accompanied by an education pack containing lesson plans and activities for all ages.

The latest interviews are with Liverpool’s Joe Allen, Manchester United’s Chris Smalling and West Ham United's Carlton Cole and Matt Jarvis.

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  • ©Justin Tallis
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  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis

Show Racism the Red Card School Competition 2016

On Thursday 28th April West Ham United FC hosted the Show Racism the Red Card awards ceremony for the annual school competition at the Boleyn Ground.

The national competition enables young people to produce anti-racism themed entries in a variety of mediums, including artwork, creative writing, film and music, having worked with SRtRC resources during classroom sessions. Details of all the winners can be found here.

You can see the winning entries here:
SRtRC School Competition 2016 - Overall Winner
SRtRC School Competition 2016 - All Ages & Abilities Multi-Media Category, Runner-up
SRtRC School Competition 2016 - All Ages & Abilities Multi-Media Category 3rd place

The presenters of this year's ceremony were TV personality Lisa Rogers & former West Ham United FC player Leroy Resenior. Guests of honour were current West Ham United FC players Sam Byram & Reece Oxford who were joined by former West Ham United FC player Bobby Barnes. Chelsea L.F.C and England winger Gemma Davison was also joined by West Ham Ladies Defender Katie Bottom.

The NUT supports Show Racism the Red Card, the campaign that uses top footballers to educate against racism.

Show Racism the Red Card has filmed professional football players addressing issues surrounding racism. The films help teachers and other training professionals to deliver training in their schools and workplaces. Each of the films is accompanied by an education pack containing lesson plans and activities for all ages.

The latest interviews are with Liverpool’s Joe Allen, Manchester United’s Chris Smalling and West Ham United's Carlton Cole and Matt Jarvis.

  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis
  • ©Justin Tallis

Show Racism the Red Card School Competition 2016

On Thursday 28th April West Ham United FC hosted the Show Racism the Red Card awards ceremony for the annual school competition at the Boleyn Ground.

The national competition enables young people to produce anti-racism themed entries in a variety of mediums, including artwork, creative writing, film and music, having worked with SRtRC resources during classroom sessions. Details of all the winners can be found here.

You can see the winning entries here:
SRtRC School Competition 2016 - Overall Winner
SRtRC School Competition 2016 - All Ages & Abilities Multi-Media Category, Runner-up
SRtRC School Competition 2016 - All Ages & Abilities Multi-Media Category 3rd place

The presenters of this year's ceremony were TV personality Lisa Rogers & former West Ham United FC player Leroy Resenior. Guests of honour were current West Ham United FC players Sam Byram & Reece Oxford who were joined by former West Ham United FC player Bobby Barnes. Chelsea L.F.C and England winger Gemma Davison was also joined by West Ham Ladies Defender Katie Bottom.

Canllaw Dyletswyddau Cydraddoldeb ar gyfer Cynrychiolwyr Ysgolion, Adrannau ac Athrawon Lywodraethwyr

Ynglŷn â’r canllaw yma
Diben y canllaw yw:

  • Codi ymwybyddiaeth o’r dyletswyddau cydraddoldeb;
  • Hyrwyddo arferion a pholisïau da mewn ysgolion a cholegau
  • Darparu adnoddau ar gyfer hyrwyddo arferion a pholisïau da mewn ysgolion a cholegau; a
  • Arfogi gweithwyr achos â’r wybodaeth a’r hyder i ddatrys gwaith achos gan ddefnyddio’r dyletswyddau cydraddoldeb.

Pa ddeddfwriaeth sy’n berthnasol i’r canllaw hwn?

Disability History Month

UK Disability History month (UKDHM) formally takes place between 22 November and 22 December each year, though many events and activities take place outside this time slot. It is supported by more than 100 organisations, including the NUT, and celebrates the lives and achievements of disabled people. Schools are encouraged to hold awareness raising activities about disability during the month of December.

Resources Challenging Racism

The NUT has worked with a number of organisations to develop practical educational resources for teachers on how to challenge racism, anti-immigrant racism and Islamophobia. The resources contain a wide variety of activities for discussion and lesson planning.

LGBT Equality in Education - advice for members with guidance for school representatives'

New advice for NUT members on developing policies on LGBT equality in education.

NUT statement on Section 9 of the Asylum and Immigration Act 2004

The National Union of Teachers (NUT) notes with concern that under the amendments to asylum law made by Section 9 of the Asylum and Immigration Act (Treatment of Claimants etc) 2004, families who have reached the end of the asylum process and exhausted all their appeal rights can have their financial support and accommodation removed if they ‘fail to take reasonable steps’ to leave the UK. In the event that families are made destitute, they can face having their children removed and taken into the care of social services.

World of Inclusion resources

The NUT is fully committed to inclusive education and to exploring and sharing the factors that support and enable teachers to develop inclusion and meet the needs of disabled teachers as well as children and young people with SEN. The following resources are useful for schools to refer to:

6 films of workshops on challenging disablist bullying in six schools and supporting materials available here.

Mosaic – victims of Nazi persecution

The NUT and the Holocaust Educational Trust worked together to produce online resources that are intended to help address some of the most common misconceptions about Nazi ideology which arise in different victim groups. Who was persecuted, How and Why? These teaching materials which are aimed at secondary school pupils include a powerful collection of case studies, focusing on the persecution by the Nazis of different groups of people. Case studies include experiences of trade unionists and the persecution of black people, persons with disabilities, Poles, Soviet PoWs, Gay men and Jehovah’s Witnesses. Guidance notes for teachers are also included.

For further educational resources and Continuing Professional Development opportunities, please visit the Trust’s website at www.het.org.uk

Persecution of Poles

   
Soviet Prisoners of War
  • Nazi persecution of Soviet Prisoners of War - Teachers' notes
  • Nazi persecution of Soviet Prisoners of War - poster
  • Konstantin Alexandrovich Shilov - postcard
   

Persecution of Gay Men

   
Persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses
   
Persecution of Black People
   
Persecution of Trade Unionists
   
Disabled people and the Euthanasia Programme
   
Persecution of Gypsies and the Porrajmos
   
Jews in Hungary
   
Paul's journey
   
Martin and Erica's Journey
  • Martin and Erica's Journey - leaflet
  • Martin and Erica's Journey - notes

Equality toolkit English

About this toolkit
The purpose of this toolkit is to:

  • Raise awareness of the equality duties;
  • Promote good policies and practices in schools and colleges;
  • Provide resources for the promotion of good policies and practices in schools and colleges; and
  • Provide caseworkers with the knowledge and confidence to resolve casework using the equality duties.

What legislation does this toolkit relate to?

  • The Equality Act 2010
  • The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) Regulations 2011
  • The Equality Act 2010 (Statutory Duties) (Wales) Regulations 2011

Who is the toolkit for?
This toolkit is aimed at school representatives and teacher governors in all schools and FE colleges, including independent schools in England and Wales.  It will also be a useful resource for Division Secretaries and Equalities Officers.

Key points

  • Schools, colleges and local authorities are under a statutory duty to be proactive in the elimination of discrimination and the promotion of equal opportunities for both staff and pupils.  This means they must assess the impact of their policies and practices on the people affected by them and take steps to remove any barriers that come to light where it is proportionate to do so.
  • Schools, colleges and local authorities also have a statutory duty to foster good relations between people who share a particular protected characteristic and those who do not. 
  • Protected characteristics encompass age, disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.
  • Local authorities and the governing bodies of maintained schools, academies and colleges with 150 or more employees have a specific legal duty to annually publish information about the workforce which demonstrates compliance with the general equality duty.  Public authorities in Wales are required to publish information about employees each year regardless of the size of their workforce.
  • All schools and colleges in England, regardless of the size of their workforce, should publish equality information about their employees each year to demonstrate compliance with the general equality duty, even where there is no specific legal obligation for them to do so.

History, purpose and effect of the Public Sector Equality Duty

The General Duty

The Specific Duties - England

The Specific Duties - Wales

The protected characteristics - who is protected?

External Resources & Events

The Children's Society has created a free domestic violence resource for teachers

Using online activities, case studies, flash animated stories and downloadable resources, teachers can help children identify how they feel about domestic violence, who they can turn to when they encounter it, and how to solve problems constructively.

To try out the new "When it hurts at home" unit, or register free, visit www.mylife4schools.org.uk

Stonewall has produced guidance for schools on including a range of families.

The new guide – the third in a series of education guides on different ways of effectively tackling all forms of homophobic bullying – contains simple, practical advice on ensuring that teaching reflects the reality and diversity of 21st century family life. It also showcases leading schools from Stonewall's Education Champions programme.

For Further information visit http://www.stonewall.org.uk/at_school/education_for_all/default.asp

Gender Identity Research and Education Society (GIRES) has launched www.tcrime.net

A space for victims of Transphobic crime to report their experience. It is confidential and allows individuals if they wish to ask for help from one of the trans support organisations and even report the crime to the police.
The GTCE has launched A ‘teaching and disability' e-conference

The e-conference, hosted by the General Teaching Council for England (GTCE) on behalf of the Disabled Teacher Taskforce (DTT), is designed to facilitate discussion about the challenges faced by people with disabilities in teaching and examine what steps are required to address these issues.

The e-conference aims to gather views and experiences from teachers with disabilities in relation to their initial teacher training and their employment in schools. The discussions captured by the e-conference will form part of the evidence base to inform future work of the Disabled Teacher Taskforce, helping to focus priorities for action and testing some of the themes and issues which arose from the 2009 seminar, Disability and Teaching: Sharing your experiences.
Please visit www.gtce.org.uk/event and click on the event – Teaching and disability; removing barriers, promoting opportunities.

Beat Bullying: The Big March

The Big March will be a digital first - a truly groundbreaking collaborative campaign hosted entirely online and set to culminate at No. 10 Downing Street, where our virtual marchers will hand in a Petition asking Government for help to protect children from bullying, violence and harassment.

Companies and brands including Google, YouTube, Facebook, Barry M, Piczo, Stardoll, Habbo, Pom Bear, Girlguiding UK, Mumsnet, National Union of Students, the Metropolitan Police, TOTAL Little Learners and Robinson Fruit Shoot have joined forces with numerous charities including the Office of the Children's Commissioner, the Prince's Trust, Children England, Action for Children and Raceonline2012 to allow the Big March to make a stand on their websites.

Pupils, parents and schools can get involved visit http://www.beatbullying.org/abw2010/takeaction.html

If you are interested in becoming an Equality Officer or would like to get involved with the Unions equality work please contact Kat Fletcher by email on k.fletcher@nut.org.uk

Equal Pay & The Equal Pay Act 1970

be fair

 

The struggle for equal pay lies at the heart of exploring women's campaign for fair and equal rights in the workplace. The TUC backed "Union Makes Us Strong" website includes a historical introduction to the campaign for equal pay covering the 1830s, to the introduction of the Equal Pay Act in 1970. The campaign for equal pay has a long history; one which is still ongoing. Women were often a marginalised sector of the workforce and were effectively excluded from many unions until the latter part of the 19th century.

The story of the Women Chainmakers' fight for a living wage, provide ideal opportunities for challenging traditional attitudes about women's place in society. In 1910 the Women Chainmakers of Cradley Heath formed a trade union and won the first minimum wage agreement after a strike battle lasting for 10 weeks.  This increased the wages of the poorest workers by some 150 per cent and remains today one of the most inspiring tales of workers' struggle.

Women's low pay is rooted in long standing assumptions about a woman's place. The jobs women do attract lower wages. Mary Macarthur's story, and her dedication to improving conditions for working women, form an ideal route into a study of past campaigns for equal pay.

The Equal Pay Act

On 7th June 1968, 850 women machinists working at the Ford Factory in Dagenham went on strike for equal pay after discovering they were being paid 15 per cent less than men for doing the same work. The demands of these women paved the way for the enactment of equal pay legislation in 1970. You might want to look at both equal pay and the position and status of British women in the late 1960s. The Film Education charity has produced digital teaching materials exploring the film Made in Dagenham. The TUC has produced a series of films about the fight for equal pay. They include oral history interviews with women and union representatives involved in some of the major equal pay cases since 1968 including the film "A Woman's Worth: the Story of the Ford Sewing Machinists".

The Equal Pay Act 1970 gives an individual a right to the same contractual pay and benefits as a person of the opposite sex in the same employment, where the man and the woman are doing:

  • like work; or
  • work rated as equivalent under an analytical job evaluation study; or
  • work that is proved to be of equal value.

The Equal Pay Act has now become part of the 2010 Equality Act.

The first effect of the Equal Pay Act 1970 was to remove separate lower women's rates of pay. Before 1970, it was common practice in the private sector and some parts of the public sector for there to be separate, and lower, women's rates of pay. So, for example at the Ford Motor Company, before a new pay structure was introduced in 1967, there were four grades for production workers:

  • male - skilled
  • male - semi-skilled
  • male - unskilled
  • female

The only significant group of female production workers at Ford were sewing machinists, who were paid less than male toilet cleaners and stores workers.
The Equal Pay Act introduced an 'implied equality clause' into all employees' contracts. This had the effect of eliminating separate lower women's rates of pay. All such rates had to be raised to at least the lowest male rate over a 5 year period between 1970 and 1975.

Some employers got round the legislation, for example, by raising the women's rates to the lowest male rate, even when the women's jobs were more demanding than the men's, or by creating different job titles for the women. Despite these strategies, full-time women's average earnings compared to men's rose by 5 per cent, from 72 per cent to 77 per cent, over a 5 year period in the 1970s - the biggest ever increase in this ratio.

Nearly 40 years after the introduction of the Equal Pay Act 1970 the struggle for equal pay still persists. The gender pay gap in Britain remains among the highest in the European Union with women earning 15.5% less than men. The Fawcett Society estimates that that removing barriers to women working in occupations traditionally done by men and increasing women's participation in the labour market could be worth between £15 and £23 Billion or 1.3 to 2% of GDP.
The Equal Pay Act has now become part of the Equality Act 2010. The Act brings together nine separate pieces of legislation, including the Sex Discrimination Act, the Race Relations Act and the Disability Discrimination Act simplifying the law and strengthening it in important ways to help tackle discrimination and inequality.
Unfortunately a section of the Equality Act that would have given powers to make companies disclose pay differences between men and women, if by 2013 they continued to show no evidence of tackling them, has been removed. This removal of the threat of disclosure may lead to a decline in the closing of the gap between men and women's pay.

Materials and Resources on Equal Pay

Equality

Welcome to the equality section. Equality is a key priority that runs through the NUT’s work. For more details please click one of the links below.

10 tips to tackle disablist language based bullying in school - A guide for staff

The use of verbal abuse as a form of bullying of disabled children and young people is widespread. This has a significant negative impact on self-esteem and achievement.

We Want Choices and Rights in our Lives – Appendices

  • Appendix 1  Disabled people who have made a difference
  • Appendix 2  Famous people with physical disabilities
  • Appendix 3  Famous people with autism
  • Appendix 4  Famous people with mental health impairments

List of external website resources for use with Themes D and E:

We Want Choices and Rights in our Lives - a UK Disability History Month Resource Pack

UKDHM formally takes place between 22nd November and 22nd December each year, though many events and activities take place outside this time slot. It is supported by more than 100 organisations, including the NUT.

The purpose of UK Disability History Month is:-

  • To raise awareness of the unequal position of disabled people in society and to advocate disability equality
  • To develop an understanding of the historical roots of this inequality
  • To highlight the significance of disabled people’s campaign for equality and inclusion and the ‘social model’ of disability.

Throughout Disability History Month it is important to recognise that disabled people have multiple identities, are sometimes members of other groups subjected to discriminatory practice, and to ensure that the diverse nature of disabled people is recognised in terms of the range and types of impairment that are included e.g. Neuro-diverse, mental health issues, learning difficulty, physical, invisible and sensory impairments.    

Key foci of the month are:

  • Advocating equality for disabled people
  • Promoting disability equality and inclusion -‘Nothing About Us, Without Us’
  • Examining the roots of ‘Disabilism’- negative attitudes, harassment and hate crime
  • Celebrating disabled people’s history - struggles for rights, equality and inclusion
  • Challenging and exposing the unequal position of disabled people in our society
  • The Cultural and Artistic portrayal of disabled people 
  • Highlighting examples of good disability equality.

Violence against women and girls

The UN declaration on violence against women (1993) defines such violence as:

any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.

The vast majority of these violent acts are perpetrated by men on women and girls and includes domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, so-called ‘honour based violence', female genital mutilation and forced marriage.

Each year across the UK 3 million women experience violence, and there are many more living with the legacies of abuse experienced in the past.
Figures from the End Violence Again Women YouGov poll (2010) show that almost one in three girls have experienced unwanted sexual touching at school. Nearly three quarters of the children polled reported hearing sexual name calling towards girls on an almost daily basis at school.

A key issue concerned with preventing violence against women is the persistence of attitudes that normalise violence against women and girls. Over one in three people believe that a woman should be held wholly or partly responsible for being sexually assaulted or raped if she was drunk.

The inclusion of issues central to gender equality and violence against women and girls in the school curriculum is a vital tool in changing attitudes, and empowering young girls and boys to understand that any form of violence, abuse or controlling behaviour in a relationship must not be tolerated.

The End Violence Against Women Coalition (EVAW) has repeatedly highlighted the sexualisation of women in the media and popular culture as a 'conducive context' for violence against women and has called for action to tackle this. Research shows that adults who viewed sexually objectifying images of women in the mainstream media were more likely to be accepting of violence.

There is a clear link between consumption of sexualised images, a tendency to view women as objects and the acceptance of aggressive attitudes and behaviour as the norm. Using materials and resources that promotes positive role models for young men and young women and challenges gender stereotypes can be an important part of examining women's representation in media and popular culture.

Resources on violence against women and girls

Women and poverty

Women are more likely to experience persistent poverty. More than one fifth of women, 22 per cent, have a persistent low income, compared to approximately 14 per cent of men. Living in persistent poverty denies women the opportunity to build up savings and assets to fall back on in times of hardship. This effect accumulates for older women which can result in extensive poverty.

For men, economic inactivity is a major route into poverty. This is also true for women, but women face additional poverty risks as a result of their lower earning power, caring responsibilities and changing family structure.

When exploring issues of female poverty you might want to focus on the impact of funding cuts to public services and welfare benefits. Current moves to reduce the deficit have left women facing a ‘triple jeopardy' of slashed benefits, job cuts, and a reduction in the core public services that they rely on for themselves and those they care for.

Black and Minority Ethnic women experience considerably higher rates of poverty than white women in the UK. The 2005 Fawcett Society's report, on Black and Minority Ethnic Women in the UK, highlighted that the incidence of poverty varies greatly between different ethnic groups and is greatest for Pakistani and Bangladeshi women. A number of intersecting factors contributing to women's poverty help explain why BME women are particularly vulnerable:

  • lower pay;
  • higher rates of unemployment and economic inactivity;
  • likelihood of being a single parent;
  • likelihood of having a large family.

There is a strong link between female poverty and child poverty. In their report "Gender and Poverty" the Fawcett Society state that women's poverty is closely linked to their family status and caring roles with women heading their own households, especially lone mothers, at a greater risk of experiencing poverty.

2009 figures produced for the Department of Work & Pensions reveal that 52 per cent of children living in single parent families are poor.

Working mothers are more likely than fathers to be in low paid jobs. Figures from the Fawcett Society show that 64 per cent of the lowest paid workers are women, contributing not only to women's poverty but to the poverty of their children

  • There are almost four times as many women in part-time work as men. Part-time workers are likely to receive lower hourly rates of pay than full-time workers.
  • Nine out of ten lone parents are women. The median gross weekly pay for male single parents is £346, while for female single parents it is £194.40

The NUT believes that tackling female poverty should be a key part of any strategy aimed at ending child poverty.

Resources on Women and Poverty

Video resources to support teaching of UK poverty and inequality issues

The Women's Budget Group (WBG) http://www.wbg.org.uk/WG_Poverty.htm

Global issues affecting women and girls

Girls and education

Currently 75 million children, of whom 41 million are girls, do not go to primary school. Education International reports that women and girls face particular obstacles that keep them out of education, including:

  • violence on the way to school, in and around schools;
  • early pregnancy and early marriage;
  • vulnerability to the HIV epidemic,
  • discrimination based on gender stereotypes in the wider community and at schools;
  • school fees, which may mean that parents send their boys and not their girls to school; and
  • lack of gender sensitive quality education especially in rural areas.

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) state that education is especially significant for girls and women. This is true not only because education is an entry point to other opportunities, but also because the educational achievements of women can have ripple effects within the family and across generations. Investing in girls' education is one of the most effective ways to reduce poverty. Investments in secondary school education for girls yields especially high dividends. Every one-percentile growth in female secondary schooling results in a 0.3 percent growth in the economy. Yet girls are often not educated in the poorest countries.

Girls who have been educated are likely to marry later and to have smaller and healthier families. Educated women can recognise the importance of health care and know how to seek it for themselves and their children. Education helps girls and women to know their rights and to gain confidence to claim them. However, women's literacy rates are significantly lower than men's in most developing countries.

The "Send My Sister" to school campaign

The Send My Sister to School campaign, organised by the Global Campaign for Education (GCE) was launched for 2011 to highlight the barriers to education for girls and women. The GCE is inviting UK pupils to become global active citizens and speak out for the education of girls.
Every extra year that a girl gets in school has a great impact on her future. It helps her earn more to escape poverty, keeps her safe from HIV/AIDS, and reduces the risk that her child will die in infancy.

Each year millions of teachers and students from around the world remind their leaders of the important promise they made to get every child into school by 2015.
A free resource pack, including a DVD, posters and stickers, plus lesson plans, films and lots more information is available on the website.

Resources on other global issues affecting women and girls

The right to vote

be fair

There is a wealth of information and resources to draw upon when looking at the history of women's rights in Britain. The 20th century saw an incredible change in the roles of women. At the start of the century women were denied a voice and a vote and were told that their place was in the home.

be fairIn 1867 the London society for Women's Suffrage was formed to campaign for female suffrage. The Women's suffrage movement was one of the few political movements in the history of Britain to cut across all classes – for no women could vote regardless of her position. The right for women to vote in 1918, the Representation of the Peoples Act, allowed women over 30 the right to vote. It would take a further ten years to abolish the age qualification. This was a milestone in women's plight for equality and laid the foundations for the 1928 victory which saw women gaining the right to vote on equal grounds to men.
Materials and resources on Women's Suffrage

The right to vote

International Women's Day

Internationa womens dayInternational Women's Day is a day to celebrate the role of women in the community, and wider society. International Women's Day has its roots in the labour movement at the beginning of the 20th century. The first International Women's Day was launched on 8 March 1911 in Copenhagen by Clara Zetkin, Leader of the 'Women's Office' for the Social Democratic Party in Germany.

Women and society

Whilst the last century has seen significant progress of women's empowerment, there are still many inequalities which plague the lives of women today. Black and Minority Ethnic women in the UK face additional barriers to achieving equality. In common with all women they face gender discrimination, but in addition they are also recipients of racial and religious discrimination.

NUT policy statement on preventing sexual harassment and bullying

The past ten years have witnessed a growing awareness and an increase in research into bullying in schools. Bullying is now recognised as one of the most destructive social processes that young people can experience in schools, and one of the most difficult challenges for teachers to tackle.

NUT policy statement on preventing sexual harassment and bullying

The past ten years have witnessed a growing awareness and an increase in research into bullying in schools. Bullying is now recognised as one of the most destructive social processes that young people can experience in schools, and one of the most difficult challenges for teachers to tackle.

Born to be Great - A Charter on Promoting the Achievement of Black Caribbean Boys

This Charter on promoting the achievement of black Caribbean boys is rooted in the belief about the nature and purpose of education. This document is intended to be used with a wide range of audiences interested in promoting the achievement of black Caribbean boys.

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